It’s Not Too Late to Mail Back Your 2010 Census Form!

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Need Help? Census Bureau Offers Assistance by Phone, Internet and In-Person at a Local Site Near You
 
It’s not too late to mail back your 2010 Census form, and if you’re not sure how to answer the questions - or if you haven’t received a form – it’s easy to get help.
 
If you haven’t received a form, you can pick one up at a census “Be Counted” assistance center. The Census Bureau has also opened tens of thousands of “Be Counted” sites and questionnaire assistance centers throughout the state. To find one near you, call your senator’s office, or visit the census web site, http://2010.census.gov
 
The 2010 Census Web site www.2010census.gov also offers instructions on how to fill out the form in 59 languages other than English.
 
Questionnaire assistance centers offer help completing your census form and can answer questions such as: “Do I include my son who’s away at college?” (no) and “What box should I check as my race?” (there’s no right or wrong answer; it’s however you self-identify). Guidance on how to fill out the form is available in many languages.
 
Census forms are available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Russian
and Vietnamese.   Both the questionnaire assistance centers and the “Be Counted” sites are open until April 19 and can be found in places such as libraries and community centers donated by businesses and organizations.
 
Questionnaire assistance centers are staffed by trained volunteers and
Census Bureau employees. Hours and days of operation vary by site, and that information, along with addresses of assistance centers and “Be Counted” sites closest to you, can be found on an interactive map on the 2010 Census Web site (http://2010.census.gov/2010census/take10map/).
 
You can also call one of the Census questionnaire assistance hotlines — English: 1-866-872-6868, Spanish:1-866-928-2010, Chinese: 1-866-935-2010, Korean: 1-866-955-2010, Russian: 1-866-965-2010, Vietnamese: 1-866-945-2010, TDD (hearing impaired): 1-866-783-2010.
 
In New York City, you can call the 311 hotline to get assistance.