senate Bill S3166

Enacts "Stefan's law"; directs the department of transportation in the city of New York to evaluate the need for traffic control signals at intersections

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Bill Status


  • Introduced
  • In Committee
  • On Floor Calendar
    • Passed Senate
    • Passed Assembly
  • Delivered to Governor
  • Signed/Vetoed by Governor
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actions

  • 10 / Feb / 2011
    • REFERRED TO CITIES
  • 04 / Jan / 2012
    • REFERRED TO CITIES

Summary

Enacts "Stefan's law" to direct the department of transportation in the city of New York to establish a process to evaluate the need for traffic control signals at intersections in such city.

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Bill Details

See Assembly Version of this Bill:
A5182
Versions:
S3166
Legislative Cycle:
2011-2012
Current Committee:
Senate Cities
Law Section:
New York City Administrative Code
Laws Affected:
Add ยง19-180.1, NYC Ad Cd
Versions Introduced in Previous Legislative Cycles:
2009-2010: S7345, A5281
2007-2008: A1827, A1827

Sponsor Memo

BILL NUMBER:S3166

TITLE OF BILL:
An act
to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to
the establishment of specific criteria for the evaluation and placement
of traffic control signals

PURPOSE OR GENERAL IDEA OF BILL:
To require the New York city Department of Transportation to consider
specific criteria not currently considered when determining the
placement of traffic control signals.

SUMMARY OF SPECIFIC PROVISIONS:
This bill requires the Department of Transportation to examine its
current policy and establish a new process to evaluate the need for
traffic control signals. The evaluation would include consideration
of criteria that expands upon the department's current evaluation
process.
The criteria include, but are not limited to, the likely presence of
school children and bicyclists, considerations of any unique
characteristic relevant to location in question, average vehicular
speeds, and the frequency and types of accidents involving motor
vehicles and pedestrians, including property damage, based upon
information and statistics provided by the police department and
insurance companies.

The bill also requires that if a request for a traffic signal is
denied, the Department of Transportation provide a written
explanation within ten business days to the individual, group or
organization that made such a request. The Department of
Transportation would be required to send copies of the written
explanation to the state assembly member and state senator in the area.

JUSTIFICATION:
Pedestrian safety has become an increasingly important issue in New
York city where pedestrian deaths are not uncommon. On April 12,
2003, ten year old Stefan Trajkovski was struck by a speeding SUV in
Queens while riding his bicycle. The community had known for years
that the corner needed a traffic signal but a light was not installed
at that location until months after the Stefan's fatal accident.
unfortunately, Stefan's story is only one of many pedestrians and
bicyclists crossing intersections that the community has declared
dangerous but DOT's criteria determined that a traffic signal would
be unwarranted. Current policy is reactive rather than preventative
and needs to be changed.

This bill would adjust the current evaluation process for traffic
control signals to allow additional considerations to be used when
determining if a traffic control signal is warranted for a particular
intersection. The current process is based upon federal guidelines
for determining the need for traffic control signals. These
guidelines are helpful, but limit the considerations the Department
of Transportation might use in appropriate situations. The Federal
guidelines were designed for use by transportation officials
throughout the country including rural and suburban areas such that


the process does not include criteria that are unable to traffic
conditions in large cities.
This legislation supplements the federal guidelines to tailor the
evaluation process more specifically to conditions in New York city.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:
01/11/07 Referred to Cities
01/09/08 Referred to Cities
S.734S/A.5281 - 2010 - Referred to cities

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS:

EFFECTIVE DATE:
On the ninetieth day after becoming law.

view bill text
                    S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
________________________________________________________________________

                                  3166

                       2011-2012 Regular Sessions

                            I N  S E N A T E

                            February 10, 2011
                               ___________

Introduced  by  Sens. HUNTLEY, ADDABBO, PARKER -- read twice and ordered
  printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Cities

AN ACT to amend the administrative code of the  city  of  New  York,  in
  relation  to the establishment of specific criteria for the evaluation
  and placement of traffic control signals

  THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND  ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section  1.  Short  title. This act shall be known and may be cited as
"Stefan's law".
  S 2. The administrative code of the city of New  York  is  amended  by
adding a new section 19-180.1 to read as follows:
  S  19-180.1  TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNALS. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL ESTABLISH A
PROCESS BY WHICH IT EVALUATES THE NEED FOR TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNALS TO BE
PLACED AT INTERSECTIONS WITHIN THE CITY. CRITERIA TO BE INCLUDED IN SUCH
PROCESS SHALL INCLUDE, BUT SHALL NOT BE LIMITED TO,  MOTOR  VEHICLE  AND
PEDESTRIAN  TRAFFIC VOLUMES, VISIBILITY FOR BOTH MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATORS
AND PEDESTRIANS, ANY UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS RELEVANT TO THE LOCATION  IN
QUESTION,  PROXIMITY OF EXISTING TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNALS TO THE LOCATION
IN QUESTION, AVERAGE VEHICULAR SPEEDS, THE FREQUENCY AND TYPES OF  ACCI-
DENTS  INVOLVING  MOTOR  VEHICLES  AND  PEDESTRIANS, INCLUDING DAMAGE TO
PROPERTY, AT SPECIFIC INTERSECTIONS BASED UPON INFORMATION  AND  STATIS-
TICS  PROVIDED  BY  THE  POLICE  DEPARTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANIES, THE
LIKELY PRESENCE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN AND BICYCLISTS  AND  THE  ABILITY  TO
APPROPRIATELY CONTROL TRAFFIC FLOW BY IMPLEMENTING OTHER TRAFFIC CONTROL
TECHNIQUES,  SUCH  AS  SPEED  BUMPS OR SPEED LIMIT SIGNS.   WHENEVER THE
DEPARTMENT UNDERTAKES SUCH EVALUATION FOLLOWING THE REQUEST OF AN  INDI-
VIDUAL,  GROUP OR ORGANIZATION FOR THE INSTALLATION OF A TRAFFIC CONTROL
SIGNAL AT A PARTICULAR INTERSECTION AND SUCH REQUEST IS DENIED AFTER THE
COMPLETION OF SUCH EVALUATION, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL  PROVIDE  A  WRITTEN
FINDING TO SUCH INDIVIDUAL, GROUP OR ORGANIZATION UPON REQUEST DETAILING
THE  RESULTS  OF  THE EVALUATION UPON WHICH ITS DETERMINATION WAS BASED.

 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                      [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                           LBD08776-01-1

S. 3166                             2

SUCH WRITTEN FINDING SHALL BE PROVIDED WITHIN TEN BUSINESS DAYS OF  SUCH
REQUEST,  WITH COPIES SENT TO THE MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY AND STATE
SENATOR IN WHOSE DISTRICT SUCH EVALUATED INTERSECTION IS LOCATED.
  S  3.  This  act shall take effect on the ninetieth day after it shall
have become a law, provided that any administrative  actions,  including
the promulgation of rules, necessary to implement the provisions of this
act  on  its  effective date are authorized and directed to be taken and
completed on or before such effective date.

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