senate Bill S4414

Designates Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) as a communicable disease, and requires general hospitals to identify, track and report upon such disease

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Bill Status


  • Introduced
  • In Committee
  • On Floor Calendar
    • Passed Senate
    • Passed Assembly
  • Delivered to Governor
  • Signed/Vetoed by Governor
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actions

  • 26 / Mar / 2013
    • REFERRED TO HEALTH
  • 30 / Apr / 2013
    • 1ST REPORT CAL.479
  • 01 / May / 2013
    • 2ND REPORT CAL.
  • 06 / May / 2013
    • ADVANCED TO THIRD READING
  • 03 / Jun / 2013
    • PASSED SENATE
  • 03 / Jun / 2013
    • DELIVERED TO ASSEMBLY
  • 03 / Jun / 2013
    • REFERRED TO HEALTH
  • 08 / Jan / 2014
    • DIED IN ASSEMBLY
  • 08 / Jan / 2014
    • RETURNED TO SENATE
  • 08 / Jan / 2014
    • REFERRED TO HEALTH
  • 20 / May / 2014
    • 1ST REPORT CAL.867
  • 21 / May / 2014
    • 2ND REPORT CAL.
  • 28 / May / 2014
    • ADVANCED TO THIRD READING
  • 10 / Jun / 2014
    • PASSED SENATE
  • 10 / Jun / 2014
    • DELIVERED TO ASSEMBLY
  • 10 / Jun / 2014
    • REFERRED TO HEALTH

Summary

Designates Carbapenem-resistent Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) as a communicable disease, and requires general hospitals to identify, track and report upon such disease.

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Bill Details

See Assembly Version of this Bill:
A8001
Versions:
S4414
Legislative Cycle:
2013-2014
Current Committee:
Assembly Health
Law Section:
Public Health Law
Laws Affected:
Add Art 21 Title 8 §2180, amd §2819, Pub Health L

Sponsor Memo

BILL NUMBER:S4414

TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the public health law, in relation to
designating Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) as a
communicable disease and requiring general hospitals to identify and
track the incidence of such communicable disease in accordance with
the hospital acquired infection reporting system

PURPOSE: Designates Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) as
a communicable disease, and requires physicians, hospitals, or
institutions to identify, track, and report upon such disease.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:

Section one amends Article 21 of the Public Health Law by adding a new
Title eight. Section 2180 of Title eight requires the Commissioner to
designate CRE as a communicable disease in the sanitary code and
requires general hospitals to track each incidence of CRE and report
such incidences on a monthly basis to the department in accordance
with the state's hospital acquired infection reporting system.

Section two amends § 2819 of the Public Health Law to include CRE as a
hospital acquired infection.

Section three states the effective date.

JUSTIFICATION: The Center for Disease Control has called CRE the
"nightmare bacteria," and issued a March 2013 report calling for rapid
action. CRE bacteria are difficult to treat because they are
resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Some CRE bacteria have become
resistant to almost all available antibiotics and can be deadly-one
report cites they can contribute to death in up to 50% of patients who
become infected. Further, CRE can turn other bacteria in the body into
drug-resistant bacteria as well.

CRE infections are most commonly seen in sick patients with exposure
to health care settings like hospitals and long-term care facilities,
such as skilled nursing facilities, and long-term acute care
hospitals. Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators,
urinary catheters, or intravenous catheters, and patients who are
taking long courses of certain antibiotics are among those most at
risk for CRE infections. Bacteria are spread by person-to person
contact, mostly via hands. The CDC has urged doctors, hospital leaders
and public health professionals to work together to implement the
CDC's "detect and protect" strategy to stop these infections from
spreading. One such measure is the reporting by medical facilities of
any instances of CRE.

This legislation responds to the CDC's suggested strategies by making
mandatory the reporting of CRE. Cases of CRE should be reported and
track by the Department of Health to adequately address incidences and
ensure appropriate control measures are being taken. New York already
has systems in place to track and report other communicable diseases
and hospital acquired infections and is in a good position to add CRE
to that process. By adopting this legislation, New York will join the
six other states requiring medical facilities to report incidences of


CRE. By doing so, we can halt the spread of this potentially deadly
bacteria.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: New bill.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: None.

EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect immediately.

view bill text
                    S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
________________________________________________________________________

                                  4414

                       2013-2014 Regular Sessions

                            I N  S E N A T E

                             March 26, 2013
                               ___________

Introduced  by  Sen.  HANNON -- read twice and ordered printed, and when
  printed to be committed to the Committee on Health

AN ACT to amend the public health law, in relation to designating Carba-
  penem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) as a communicable disease and
  requiring general hospitals to identify and  track  the  incidence  of
  such  communicable  disease  in  accordance with the hospital acquired
  infection reporting system

  THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND  ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section  1. Article 21 of the public health law is amended by adding a
new title 8 to read as follows:
                                 TITLE 8
                          CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT
                           ENTEROBACTERIACEAE
SECTION 2180. DESIGNATION  AS  COMMUNICABLE  DISEASE;  GENERAL  HOSPITAL
                REPORTING.
  S  2180. DESIGNATION AS COMMUNICABLE DISEASE; GENERAL HOSPITAL REPORT-
ING.  1. THE COMMISSIONER SHALL DESIGNATE AS A COMMUNICABLE DISEASE  AND
INCLUDE AS SUCH IN THE SANITARY CODE, CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT ENTEROBACTER-
IACEAE  (CRE).  SUCH  DISEASE SHALL BE SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THIS
ARTICLE WHICH ARE APPLICABLE TO OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES.
  2. EVERY GENERAL HOSPITAL SHALL IDENTIFY AND TRACK  EACH  INCIDENT  OF
CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT  ENTEROBACTERIACEAE, AND SHALL, ON A MONTHLY BASIS,
REPORT EACH SUCH INCIDENT TO THE DEPARTMENT. FURTHERMORE, THE DEPARTMENT
SHALL INCLUDE CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT ENTEROBACTERIACEAE IN ITS REGULATIONS
REQUIRING GENERAL HOSPITALS  TO  IDENTIFY,  TRACK  AND  REPORT  HOSPITAL
ACQUIRED INFECTIONS PURSUANT TO SECTION TWENTY-EIGHT HUNDRED NINETEEN OF
THIS CHAPTER.
  S 2. Subdivision 1 of section 2819 of the public health law is amended
by adding a new closing paragraph to read as follows:
  SUCH  TERM  SHALL ALSO INCLUDE CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT ENTEROBACTERIACEAE
(CRE).
  S 3. This act shall take effect immediately.

 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                      [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                           LBD10097-01-3

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