CUTTING RED TAPE TO CREATE JOBS

 

CUTTING RED TAPE TO CREATE JOBS

We all know that one of the keys to a booming economy is creating jobs.  But what’s the driving force behind allowing businesses to expand and grow employment opportunities?  Cutting red tape.  For years, New York has been known for its high taxes and regulations.  As state senator, it’s a top priority for me to not only cut taxes, but also to do away with burdensome regulations that hinder the growth of businesses in the Central and Northern New York region. 

Recently, I was pleased to be part of an effort to collect ideas from small businesses, farmers, manufacturers and other employers on ways to cut red tape.  That effort identified 2,219 specific rules, regulations and practices that employers believe puts New York at a competitive disadvantage for attracting and creating jobs.

Part of this initiative included industry-specific public forums that took place throughout New York State.  I hosted one of the first of these sessions in Watertown, focusing on agriculture.

Throughout the course of the forums, several common suggestions related to the state’s regulatory structure emerged, including: 

 

·        

Agencies should provide guidance in navigating complex regulations, which often times can be more burdensome than complying with the regulation itself;

 

·        

Agencies should be held accountable to timely respond to permit, license and grant applications as well as inquires from businesses;

 

·        

Agencies should develop fair and predictable regulations;

 

·        

Commissioners should be held accountable to conduct an agency-by-agency review of regulations as required by law; and

 

·        

Agencies should communicate to avoid conflicting regulatory interpretations

 

You can read the report that outlines the results of the public forums here.

Similar to these efforts, I’m working with local leaders who are a part of my “Mandate Relief Working Group” to identify unnecessary mandates to help our counties, schools and local governments reduce expenses too. The group has already forwarded two dozen recommendations, several of which have been enacted into law and I’m looking forward to continuing to work with them to find ways to reduce expenses. 

These efforts are a perfect starting point for improving New York State’s regulatory environment.  In the months to come, I am looking forward to working with my colleagues to help do away with red tape to allow businesses in our state to grow and to attract new businesses to our region.