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Legislation Signed Into Law By The Governor

 

Legislation to provide workers with written notice of their regular and overtime wage rates.  (Signed into law, Chapter 270)


 
NEWS FROM
State Senator George Onorato
Chair, New York State Senate
Standing Committee on Labor


FOR RELEASE: August 7, 2009
CONTACT: Janet K. Kash  (518)455-3486

LEGISLATION SPONSORED BY SENATOR ONORATO TO CLARIFY EMPLOYEE PAY RATES SIGNED INTO LAW BY GOVERNOR PATERSON

     State Senator George Onorato (D-Queens), the chairman of the Senate Standing Committee on Labor, today announced that Governor David A. Paterson has approved his legislation (S.3357/Chapter 270) to ensure that New York workers are made fully aware of their regular and overtime rates of pay upon hiring. 


    “I guess you could describe this as a ‘truth in paycheck’ law,” said Senator Onorato.  “Under this measure, employers will be required to provide information in writing about their regular hourly wage rates, overtime rates, and regular pay day to newly-hired employees.  This will make it easier for employees, especially those who are paid by the week, to determine whether they are being properly paid for all of the regular and overtime hours they may have worked.”

    Under the legislation, which was initially proposed by the New York State Department of Labor, employees will also be required to acknowledge in writing that they have received this information.  

    “This new law will help to avoid confusion between workers and employers about pay rates, which should in turn foster more positive and informed working relationships,” said Senator Onorato.  “In addition, this disclosure requirement should also prove valuable in those instances where the Labor Department is investigating alleged wage violations to determine whether an employee has been shortchanged.  Having the agreed-upon wage rates in writing will be useful in assessing these cases.”

    The new law goes into effect on October 26, 2009.

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