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Message to the Democrat Leadership: Stop Reaching into Our Pockets!

 

It is truly unfathomable that the New York City politicians running this State continue to ignore the public outcry for tax relief.  They need to stop reaching in to the pockets of every taxpayer in New York as their sole means to solve the State’s fiscal crisis.


Not only will we be required to buy new $25 license plates, but we are also getting hit with higher motor vehicle registration and license fees which will increase by 25%.  And those of us residing in Dutchess County will get hit even harder with higher license and registration fees to support the MTA bail-out package that was shoved down our throats.  The New York City Democrat leaders that pushed through these fee increases have shown a callous disregard for those of us living in rural and suburban counties who own cars as a necessity, not as a luxury. 


The motor vehicle fee increases were part of an $8.5 billion tax and fee hike adopted in this year’s budget.  As a result, the average middle class family will be hit by roughly $2400 in new taxes and fees which includes a higher utility tax.  I voted against the budget, as did every one of my Senate Republican colleagues. 


They have chosen to charge us more to support their bloated budget.  They fought MTA fare increases and the tolls on the New York City bridges and instead raised our taxes and our license and registration fees to support the fiscally mismanaged transit system from which relatively few in Dutchess County derive any benefit.


I am incensed by the actions of the Governor and the Democrat-led Senate and Assembly.  I will continue to be a loud voice opposing any new tax increase.  The last thing any of us needs, particularly in a recession, is irresponsible state leaders addicted to taxing and spending. 


Soon, the State Legislature will be called back to Albany to address a $2.1 billion shortfall.  If past practice is an indicator of how this fiscal crisis will be resolved, we can bet that the Senate and Assembly leadership will want to take more money from taxpayers rather than exercising some discipline and cut spending as they should have in April.