Press Release - Senator Betty Little Hosts Plattsburg Heroin Task Force Forum

 

SENATE TASK FORCE SEEKS ANSWERS TO ADDRESS HEROIN, OPIOID ABUSE

Senator Betty Little and Senator Phil Boyle, chair of the NYS Senate Task Force on Heroin and Opioid Addiction, will cohost a public hearing in Plattsburgh on Friday, April 25 to solicit input from local stakeholders about effective ways to combat the growing problem of heroin and opioid abuse. 

The event is scheduled for Friday, April 25, 10 am to 12:30 pm at the Clinton County Government Center, 2nd Floor legislative chambers located at 137 Margaret Street.

“Heroin and opioid abuse is a growing problem affecting all regions of New York State and cutting across many demographics,” said Senator Betty Little.  “Addiction ruins the lives of users and devastates families and friends who struggle in vain to help.  As the epidemic grows, the cost to taxpayers does as well.  Our goal is to develop a comprehensive plan with the help of experts in various fields, including law enforcement and drug treatment, that deters use, prevents addiction and ensures help is available to those needing it.”

The public hearing is one of more than a dozen forums being held throughout the state by the bipartisan State Senate task force.

Members of the task force will examine the issues and solicit input from experts and other stakeholders about addiction prevention and treatment options, the rise in heroin and opioid use, and the potential for drug-related crimes and other negative community impacts. The task force will then develop recommendations which will be used to draft legislation to address the issues raised.

The recently enacted 2014-15 state budget includes $2.45 million for initiatives to provide prevention, treatment and addiction services to address the growing problems of heroin and opioid abuse. In addition to the creation of the task force, the Senate passed legislation (S6477B) in March to help save lives by allowing authorized health care professionals to increase public access to Narcan/Naloxone which, if timely administered, can prevent an overdose death.