Senator Carlucci Calls for Statewide Ban of Harmful Bread Chemical

 

Introduces Legislation to Ban Azodicarbonamide


Senator David Carlucci announced pending legislation
at local bakery Baked by Angels in Pearl River that would ban the use of azodicarbonamide, a chemical primarily used as an additive in synthetic leather and in the production of foamed plastics, in any baked products made or sold in New York State.

Common examples include window and door gaskets, padded floor mats, gym/exercise mats and the soles in shoes.

Because it is quick and easy to use, azodicarbonamide tends to be found in breads at fast food chains such as Subway, McDonalds, Arby's Burger King and Wendy's.

Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has designated azodicarbonamide as generally safe and allows it to be added to flour at levels up to 45 parts per million, it is banned as a food additive and in food packaging in the United Kingdom, where the Health and Safety Executive has identified it as a respiratory sensitizer (a possible cause of asthma) and has determined that products should be labeled with "may cause sensitization by inhalation."

Azodicarbonamide is also banned in the European Union and in Australia. Due to pressure from health advocates and consumers, Subway recently announced they will no longer use the chemical in their breads.

Other studies have produced evidence that it can induce asthma, other respiratory symptoms and skin sensitization. Senate Schumer has also announced he will be calling on the FDA to ban azodicarbonamide in the United States.

Senator Carlucci said, “In New York, we can't wait around for the federal government to drag their feet. In New York there is no reason why cheap food should be dangerous food.”

Diane Banter, owner of Baked by Angels said, "We never used azodicarbonamide in our products before. Here at Baked by Angels we make everything by scratch and would never dream of using a chemical that is potentially dangerous in our baking process."

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