SPORTSMEN TARGETED WITH HIGHER FEES

 

                







































































































































































    License Type


    Fee
    (all 2008-09 licenses; lifetime licenses till 9/30/09)


    Fee
    (all 2009-10 licenses; lifetime licenses after 10/1/09)


    New York Resident


    Conservation Legacy


    $76


    $96


    Super Sportsman


    $68


    $88


    Trapper Super Sportsman

     

    $88


    Sportsman


    $37


    $47


    Senior Sportsman


    $5
    (65+ years)


    $10
    (70+ years)


    Small & Big Game


    $19


    $29


    Deer Management Permit


    $10
    (fee for Junior Hunting and Small & Big Game)


    $10
    (fee exempt for Junior Hunting and Junior Bowhunting)


    Military Disabled Sportsman


    $5


    $5


    Bowhunting


    $16
    (16-65 years)


    $21
    (16-69 years)


    Free Bowhunting (ages 70+ yrs or 40%+ Military Disabled)


    $0


    $0


    Junior Bowhunting (ages 14- 15 yrs)


    $9


    $9


    Muzzleloading


    $16
    (16-65 years)


    $21
    (16-69 years)


    Free Muzzleloading (ages 70+ yrs or 40%+ Military Disabled)


    $0


    $0


    Small Game


    $16


    $26


    Junior Hunting (ages 12 - 15 yrs)


    $5


    $5


    Turkey Permit


    $5


    $10


    Trapping


    $16
    (16-65 years)


    $21
    (16-69 years)


    Discounted Trapping


    $0
    (70+ years or 40%+ Military Disabled)


    $5 (70+ years)
    $0 (40%+ Military Disabled)


    Junior Trapping (under 16 yrs)


    $6


    $6


    Fishing


    $19
    (16-64 years)


    $29
    (16-69 years)


    Senior Fishing


    $5
    (65+ years)


    $5
    (70+ years)


    7-day Fishing


    $12


    $15


    1-day Fishing


    $15


    $5


    Recreational Marine Fishing

     

    $10


    7-day Recreational Marine Fishing

     

    $8


    1-day Recreational Marine Fishing

     

    $4


    Resident Lifetime Licenses


    Sportsman1


    child under 5 yrs old


    $300


    $380


    child 5-11 yrs old


    $420


    $535


    Adult


    $600
    (12-64 years)


    $765
    (12-69 years)


    Senior


    $50
    (65+ years)


    $65
    (70+ years)


    Small and Big Game


    $350


    $535


    Bowhunting


    $180


    $235


    Muzzleloading


    $180


    $235


    Trapping


    $300


    $395


    Fishing


    $350
    (0-64 years)


    $460
    (0-69 years)


    Fishing


    $50
    (65+ years)


    $65
    (70+ years)


    Recreational Marine Fishing

     

    $150


    Combination Fishing and Recreational Marine Fishing

     

    $450

     

     


     


                                                                            ####



    ALBANY –Sportsmen will be paying much higher fees for almost every type of sporting license due to the disastrous state budget passed earlier in the year by New York City-controlled politicians, according to Senator Catharine Young (R,I,C – Olean).


     


    “These fee hikes are an another example of why I voted against the state budget that is costing the average family an additional $2,400 annually in new taxes and fees.  We need tax relief instead of tax hikes so that we can revitalize the economy and make the state a more affordable place to live and work,” said Senator Young.


     


                Starting on October 1st, the cost of resident and non-resident sportsmen licenses and all lifetime hunting and fishing licenses will increase between 25 to 63 percent, as part of the state budget that raised taxes by $8.5 billion and skyrocketed  spending by $13 billion, seven times the rate of inflation.


     


                “Every month, New Yorkers are getting hit as a result of the tax and spend state budget put together in secret by Governor Paterson and downstate political leaders,” said Senator Young.  “In June, it was a tax on beer and wine; On September 1st, it was an increase on driver license and registration fees; and now in October, it’s higher license fees for sportsmen.”


     


                Senator Young  said the license fee increases are projected to take an additional $22 million out of the pockets of hunters and fishermen that could have been spent on Upstate tourism.


     


                “Hunting and fishing have a major impact on the economy of Upstate New York, especially in rural areas that depend on tourism,” said Senator Young. “However, it is clear that the people who approved these increases do not understand or care about how they will affect Upstate.”


     


                Senator Young said the increases will affect about three dozen permits and licenses.  The cost of fishing, and small and big game licenses will increase from $19 to $29, a 53 percent hike.   In addition, muzzleloading licenses will go up 31 percent; the cost of turkey permits will double; small game licenses will go up 63 percent; and trapping licenses will increase 31 percent.  


     


    A Super Sportsman license will also run $88 after costing $68 last year and lifetime license  for residents (ages 12-64) will increase from $600 to $765 on October 1.


     


    Out-of-staters who come to New York this year will also find  a higher jump in price. Nonresident Super Sportsmen, Big Game, Bowhunting, Muzzleloading, Small Game and Fishing licenses all increased by a $30 margin.


     


    A more significant change is the qualifying age for Senior licenses.  The minimum age required to be eligible for a Senior license will move up from 65 to 70, meaning citizens approaching the former magic number of 65, who were looking forward to saving money with the much cheaper Senior licenses,  will have to pay full price for the 2009 – 2010 licenses.


     


                While the increased license fees are scheduled to take effect when the new hunting season begins on October 1, 2009, the state actually began charging more for the new season licenses on August 17th.


     


                “The number of people hunting in New York has decreased and now fewer sportsmen will be forced  to pay even more to help fund a massive spending increase that has already put the state budget more than $2 billion in the hole,” Senator Young said.  “These tax and fee hikes and out-of-control spending clearly demonstrate that New York City should not be controlling every element of state government. “


               


    Following is a chart, prepared by the Department of Environmental Conservation, that compares the old and new license rates for sportsmen: