Liz Krueger's posts related to Housing

New York Times: Luxe Builders Chase Dreams of Property Tax Exemptions

Sen. Krueger spoke with New York Times columnist Michael Powell for this piece on abuses in the 421-a tax credit program:

State Senator Liz Krueger watches such unneeded tax subsidies — for energy, insurance, tobacco and luxury development — slip like barges down a darkened canal. She notes that the housing bill “was held hostage so a few well-connected developers could rob taxpayers to the tune of millions.”

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The New York Times: Tenant's Fine for Renting to Tourist Overturned

Sen. Krueger was quoted in this New York Times piece, explaining that short-term rentals in multi-family residential buildings remain illegal, despite a small legal victory for Airbnb in an isolated, cherry-picked case.

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The Verge: One Ruling Doesn't Make Airbnb Sublets Legal

Tech news site The Verge reported on the Airbnb-backed appeal that overturned fines in one illegal short-term rental case, and quoted Liz, putting the decision into perspective.

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Statement on Appeals Board Decision in the Nigel Warren Short-Term Rental Case

The following statement is attributable to State Senator Liz Krueger (D-Manhattan):

"The New York City ECB Appeals Board decision overturning fines levied against Airbnb host Nigel Warren's landlord is little more than the exception that proves the rule. The Appeals Board dismissed the fines because Mr. Warren's roommate, who was a permanent resident of the apartment, was present in the apartment during an Airbnb customer's stay. Situations like this one, where a permanent tenant remains living in a part of the home, were never the focus of the New York law against illegal hotels.

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On Behalf of Regular New Yorkers, Sen. Krueger Responds to Airbnb's "Three Principles"

Sen. Krueger issued the following statement in response to Airbnb's recent blog post, which was circulated to media as part of an ongoing public relations and lobbying effort against New York's laws on short-term rentals.

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New York Post: Turning Your NY Apartment into a Hotel Is Illegal

Nicole Gelinas cuts through the Airbnb talking points with this thoughtful column on short-term rentals from Monday's New York Post:

Airbnb’s other argument is that its “hosts” need cash. We all need money, but we can’t break the law. Plus, by enabling rent-stabilized tenants to violate their leases as well as the law, Airbnb puts its “hosts” in danger of eviction...

Airbnb also says the money its hosts make helps them keep New York affordable. “This income is actually helping them to stay in their homes,” Airbnb policy director Molly Turner said last month.

But a landlord can get $3,000 a month for a one-bedroom legally, or $9,000 illegally. After he eventually cuts out the middleman — the tenant who thinks she’s smart in making a few extra bucks — that’s an apartment that someone can’t live in, pushing up rents for everyone.

You don’t have to believe in rent control to realize that the city should enforce laws to keep apartments as apartments.

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Answers for New Yorkers Concerned or Confused About the Illegal Hotel Law

In recent months, Airbnb and an organization calling itself “Peers” have started a major PR and lobbying campaign to overturn New York’s laws governing short-term rentals. With these businesses and groups circulating misinformation to residents, their own users, and the media, it’s important that we all know what the law is, why it’s important, and what our rights are. Please read on to learn more!

File: 
Q&A on the Illegal Hotel Law for Concerned New Yorkers

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Sen. Krueger's Statement on the Use of Airbnb for Floating Brothels

Sen. Krueger issued the following statement in reaction to today's front-page New York Post story on the use of Airbnb to facilitate floating brothels: "When residential housing ceases to be residential -- via online businesses, like Airbnb, turning residential apartments into illegal, unregulated hotel rooms -- all kinds of undesirable and illegal activity can be brought into a residential building. Prostitution wasn't really at the top of our minds when we passed the 2010 law helping NYC enforce against illegal short-term rentals, but in hindsight it seems kind of obvious.

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