Michael Gianaris's posts related to Community Development

Gianaris Announces Legislation Expanding Good Samaritan Laws

An article written by the Queens Gazette looks into the new legislation proposed by Senator Gianaris, which would expand on current New York Good Samaritan laws in order to protect local businesses and non-profits from being held liable for damages or injuries that could occur while helping a victim.

Continuing his fight to ensure safety in the neighborhood, state Senator Michael Gianaris announced he has introduced new legislation expanding New York’s Good Samaritan laws.

 The legislation would protect local businesses and non-profits offering themselves as safe havens from being held liable for damages or injuries that may have occurred while helping a victim.

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Legislature prepares for session with elections looming

The Ithaca Journal wrote an article that highlights the Senate Republicans rejection of the formation of an independent redistricting task force, which was proposed by Senate Democrats. Senator Gianaris believes that redistricting reform is an urgent matter and that Senate Republicans have abandoned their promise to fix it.

Lawmakers and Gov. Andrew Cuomo have spent recent months touting their legislative accomplishments in 2011: an on-time budget, a 2 percent property tax cap, a revamped income tax code and a sense of renewed collegiality in a Capitol long known for its partisanship.

That doesn't mean, however, that there isn't plenty on the table for 2012.

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Gianaris Blasts Possible GOP Plan to Increase State Senate Size

An editorial by Politicker NY reports on Senator Gianaris' reaction to the unconstitutional attempt by the Senate GOP to add a 63rd Senate seat. Gianaris believes this is a despicable power grab to keep their part in the majority

State Senator Mike Gianaris, who heads the Senate Democrats electoral efforts, was sharply critical of a plan Republican Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos floated yesterday, saying there’s a “good chance” the total number of New York State Senators will increase from 62 to 63 for the decennial process of redrawing district lines.

Senator Gianaris said that the “desperate” Republican conference was “brazenly violating the constitution.”

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Skelos: 63rd legislative district likely result of redistricting

NCPR's Karen DeWitt speaks to Senator Michael Gianaris about redistricting and the unconstitutional attempt by Senate Republicans to keep in control of the chamber. 

Listen to the audio here.

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Cuomo's State Address May Touch On Budget Gap, Expanded Gambling

This NY1 video includes comments from Senator Gianaris on how Senate Republicans are attempting to submit an unconstitutional plan to add a 63rd Senate seat. 

Watch the video here.

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State Senate’s top Republican predicts addition of 1 member

BuffaloNews.com wrote an article about the redistricting process and the Senate Republican's unreasonable effort to maintain their thin majority, which Senator Gianaris believes is despicable.

Despite the state’s anemic population growth, the Senate’s top Republican said his legislative chamber is likely to grow by one senator, to a total of 63, during this year’s redistricting process.

Senate Democrats immediately dismissed the move as an illegal bid by the Republicans merely to maintain their thin majority. Senate Republicans pushed through a similar one-seat increase 10 years ago to help keep control of the Senate.

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Senate Dems, GOP Spar Over Constitutionality Of 63rd Seat

Capital Tonight reports on Senate Democrats Martin Malave Dilan, Senator Michael Gianaris, and State Senator Liz Krueger speaking out against the Senate Republicans' unconstitutional addition of a 63rd Senate seat.

If one thing is clear, it’s that Senate Democrats and Republicans understand the complexity of the state constitution when it comes to redrawing district lines. Where they diverge is a matter of mathematics.

Last week, The Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment confirmed the district lines to be drawn for the next round of redistricting would include a 63rd seat. Democrats say the move is politically motivated so Republicans can strategically form lines to retain the majority.

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Same Republican tricks

The Timesunion.com editorial calls Senate Republicans out for betraying their promise to voters for an independent redistricting process.

Now here’s a map for you, New York. It’s the entire state, 54,556 square miles in all, every one of them ripe for exploitation by state Senate Republicans who will do seemingly anything to maintain their tiny majority.

First they betrayed all those voters to whom they promised, just 14 months ago, that the district boundaries for the 62 Senate seats up for grabs in this fall’s elections would be drawn by an independent commission.

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Call them on it, Mr. Cuomo

Timesunion.com wrote an editorial that exposes the Senate Republicans broken promise on independent redistricting and urges Governor Cuomo to take action.

When state Senate Republicans were asking voters in 2010 to restore their majority, they unanimously and unambiguously promised to support creating an independent body to draw new legislative district lines. Even the most casual observer of state government might have rightly asked, “What’s the catch?”

It turns out the catch was as obvious, not to mention cynical, as any escape clause one could imagine: They lied.

Read the full article here.

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Politics don't always add up

An editorial written by Times Union investigates the matter of Senate Republicans' wanting to add a 63rd Senate seat, despite the fact that New York is losing two seats in Congress. Senator Gianaris and Senate Deomcrats are opposed to the addition of a 63rd seat on the grounds that the Senate Republican ploy is unconstitutional.

New York is losing two seats in Congress, so how in the world can it add another state senator?

Under the current and much-maligned redistricting process, the Republicans who control the state's upper chamber hold the pens in the once-a-decade exercise that draws district lines. Late Friday, they released an analysis explaining why they will draw 63 Senate districts, adding a member to the chamber.

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