Phil Boyle's posts related to Drugs

Senate Bill Targets Prescription Black Market

    The New York State Senate today acted on legislation that would crack down on the growing black market in non-controlled prescription drugs which puts patients at risk and rips off taxpayers through Medicaid fraud.  Legislation (S.2942) makes it a crime to fraudulently prescribe, buy, and sell these types of medications.

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Senator Boyle To Host Teen Drug Awareness Program

Event Will Be Co-Hosted By Suffolk County Sheriff’s OfficeWEST ISLIP, NEW YORK – Senator Phil Boyle is partnering with the Suffolk County Sheriff's Alcohol and Substance Abuse Task Force and the Youth Enrichment Services to help increase awareness about the dangers associated with drug abuse and the growing heroin epidemic facing Long Island teens.  The community meeting will take place at the West Islip Public Library on Thursday, April 25 from 6:00PM to 8:00PM. 

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Senate Passes Public Safety Legislation

Bills Come On The Heels of Boston Bombings & Foiled Terrorist Train Attack With renewed calls for vigilance and increased public safety following the tragic bombings in Boston and the foiling of a terrorist plot to attack a train traveling across the state between New York and Toronto, the New York State Senate today passed a package of anti-crime legislation including a bill that would require convicted terrorists to serve their full prison sentence.

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Senate Passes Mandatory DWI Testing After Serious Accidents

Chemical Tests Would Be Required If Injury or Death OccursThe New York State Senate today passed legislation that would help increase prosecution of dangerous drivers under the influence of alcohol or drugs. The bill (S1446) would require chemical testing of drivers suspected of being under the influence when an accident occurs and results in serious injury or death.

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Senate Approves Bill To Prevent Intoxicated Drivers From Avoiding Prosecution

The New York State Senate passed legislation today to prevent drunk and drugged drivers from evading prosecution. The legislation would allow law enforcement to seek court orders to compel whenever suspected drunk or drugged drivers refuse to submit to a chemical intoxication test.Chemical tests, such as breath, blood and urine tests, determine a suspected drunk or drugged driver’s level of intoxication. Chemical tests are a critical piece of evidence used in a trial to prosecute a drunk or drugged driver for their crimes.   

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