What are your biggest fears, hopes, and/or expectations when it comes to NYPD in your community?

December 20, 2016

I was walking through the district and I happened upon this sign concerning the NYPD. It motivated me to reflect that policing in the interest of the common good and for the purposes of public safety is supposed to be of benefit to society. Many of us can think of times when the NYPD came to the aid of ourselves or a loved one, through a simple act like checking on an elderly relative of helping a young child get to school. However, we also know, through so many unfortunate incidents, such as the murder of Eric Garner, or the railroading of the Central Park Five—that law enforcement often abuses and harms members of the community they are sworn to protect. As a policymaker and elected official, it is important for me to know your thoughts on the NYPD, including your biggest fears and stories of their successes. Please share them in the space provided or submit your thoughts at our website.

Preserving Our Neighborhoods From Gentrification
Gentrification is a complex problem that, frankly, is hurting the heart and soul of our communities. Since we have moved to developing and rehabilitating housing almost exclusively through private market, profit making programs, gentrification has taken off like wildfire in two ways: New developments almost always create a small amount of affordable units, if any at all, while the great preponderance are market rate. New developments that bring in market rate tenants cause the price of everything in the area to go up: those in rent stabilized or preferential rate units face increases and are targeted for eviction—through harassment and extralegal means; unregulated rents skyrocket, even the price of bread and milk rise, as does the cost of all services in the area. It is a negative spiral. One of the latest threats in our community concerning gentrification came to a head in September when over 200 residents of Morningside Heights met with local elected officials to voice our concerns regarding over-development in our community as exemplified by the The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) and Union Theological Seminary (UTS) who are in the midst of development deals which will result in two outsize towers, one at 40 stories and the other at 32 stories between 120th Street and 122nd Street that shockingly will provide no units of affordable housing. A collection of circumstances proliferate in this case: the Morningside Heights area has no meaningful zoning restrictions, which may result in these two new “Towers Of Babel” which could potentially become the tallest structures in the area, overshadowing the majestic grandeur of Riverside Church’s steeple—an Upper Manhattan landmark. The development will take place in an area with already overcrowded schools, transportation needs, and other crumbling urban infrastructure that needs substantial investment. The project, currently in the demolition phase, has been the source of constant noise and air pollution, at times blanketing the area in dust clouds that force neighbors to keep windows shut or risk having the dust infiltrate their homes. Ultimately, the only way we can impact these projects is through collective and coordinated actions. For those wanting to know more about these particular projects, and how to get involved please visit: morningsideheightscommunitycoalition.com
Please share your feedback regarding how gentrification has impacted you and/or your family, as well as your concerns and expectations for the future of your community in the spaces provided below.
Gentrification has impacted me by...
My concerns regarding gentrification are…
The future I hope to see for my community is…
Do Not Accept White Supremacy
I was blessed and honored by your support in the recent election and overwhelmed by the positive feedback in the form of you sending me back to Albany with 95% of the vote! It has always been my honor to serve, to listen and to demand action on issues of importance to our community such as reforming our criminal justice system, enshrining health care as a human right, and making sure our environment is pristine for future generations. The times we live in are challenging and we now face an uncertain future in terms of the direction of the Federal Government. These are the moments that will test our strength and resolve and they are a call to action! Far from fighting against something, we continue to fight for a society that embodies the core principles of equality, fairness, compassion diversity and human rights. This newsletter is designed to generate feedback from the folks that really matter—YOU! It is always important to connect with you, whether it is in the streets, in our office, out at meetings or events, or through a survey, as contained in this newsletter. It’s very important for me to know what is on your mind, from the election of Donald Trump, to the issues affecting you most in your daily life, the role of the NYPD, what can be done about gentrification, and quality of life concerns, such as scaffolding. I look forward to hearing your concerns and ideas and using them to move forward in a rational, productive and principled way. Please fill out this newsletter and return it to us via mail, in person at one of our offices or complete it at our website: perkins.nysenate.gov. In the interim, I wish you, your family, friends and all your loved ones the most joyous, blessed, peaceful reflective holiday season.
As a legislator, my main priority is to address the concerns of my constituents. We often hear that housing, income inequality, policing, and health care are concerns in the community. What do you consider your top 5 concerns to be? Please be specific in the spaces provided below.
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