1. The Laws of New York
  2. Consolidated Laws
  3. State
  4. Article 2: State Boundaries


Section 4 Vermont boundary line

State (STL)

The boundary line between the state of New York and the state of Vermont shall be and hereby is fixed as follows: Beginning at a stone bound standing on the easterly slope of a hill, in latitude forty-two degrees forty-four minutes forty-five and two hundred one thousandths seconds north, longitude seventy-three degrees fifteen minutes fifty-four and nine hundred four thousandths seconds west from Greenwich, a point in the southerly line of the state of Vermont; thence the line runs on a bearing north eighty-eight degrees thirty-three minutes twenty seconds west, three thousand two hundred five and seven-tenths feet to monument number two, standing at the southwest corner of the state of Vermont; thence north eleven degrees fifty-nine seconds west, twenty-one thousand eight hundred sixty-eight and eight-tenths feet, to monument number six on the northwest slope of a mountain and one hundred ninety feet northwest to a small brook which runs into the Hoosic river about four hundred feet up stream from the lower covered bridge at North Pownal; thence north twenty-nine degrees one minute thirty-three seconds east, two thousand six hundred forty feet, to monument number seven which is a large block of granite set in the bed of the brook above mentioned and at the point where it enters Hoosic river; thence north seven degrees eighteen minutes seventeen seconds west, three hundred ninety-six feet along the west bank of Hoosic river to monument number eight on the north side of the highway leading from North Pownal to North Petersburgh and near the northwest corner of the covered bridge before mentioned; thence north twenty-one degrees twenty-one minutes forty-three seconds east, two thousand fifteen and five-tenths feet across Hoosic river to monument number nine, on southwest side of the west bound track of the Boston and Maine railroad, and is between said track and Hoosic river opposite a ledge of rock; thence north thirty degrees forty minutes seven seconds west, one thousand one hundred fifty-six and two-tenths feet along the northeast bank of Hoosic river to monument number ten between said river and the west bound track of the Boston and Maine railroad; thence north fourteen degrees forty minutes west, one thousand one hundred seventy-three and seven-tenths feet across said track and highway leading from north Pownal to Petersburgh Junction to monument number twelve, on brow of a hill just north of said highway and at the corner of two stone walls; thence north five degrees nineteen minutes fifty-seven seconds east, five thousand eighty-two feet to monument number thirteen, on the north side of a highway known as the Skipperee road and about four hundred twenty feet southeast of house on lands owned by Edgar Green; thence north forty degrees twenty minutes east, three hundred ninety-six feet to monument number fourteen, at edge of woods on the southwest slope of the hill north of the Skipperee road; thence south seventy-one degrees thirty-nine minutes fifty-five seconds east, one thousand six hundred twenty-six and two-tenths feet to monument number fifteen, in woods and on the slope of hill north of Skipperee road; thence north three degrees twenty minutes eighteen seconds east, one thousand four hundred eighty-two and three-tenths feet to monument number sixteen, at the corner of the towns of Pownal and Bennington; thence north one degree thirty-three minutes five seconds east, thirty-five thousand three hundred thirty-five and seven-tenths feet to monument number twenty-seven, at the corner of the towns of Bennington and Shaftsbury; thence north two degrees seven minutes twenty-five seconds east, thirty-five thousand one hundred sixty-five and six-tenths feet to monument number forty at the corner of the towns of Shaftsbury and Arlington; thence north two degrees forty-five minutes seventeen seconds east, thirty-three thousand nine hundred sixty-one feet to monument number fifty-two, at the corner of the towns of Arlington and Sandgate; thence north one degree twenty-seven minutes three seconds east, eleven thousand one hundred fifty-four and four-tenths feet to monument number fifty-five, on the north side of Camden Valley road and about one-quarter mile west of R. C. Smith's house; thence north two degrees forty-two minutes nine seconds east, sixteen thousand eight hundred sixty-eight and eight-tenths feet to monument number sixty, on the north side of Beattie Hollow road; thence north one degree fifty-one minutes nine seconds east, two thousand seven hundred eighty-five and three-tenths feet to monument number sixty-one on the north side of Perkins Hollow road; thence north one degree fifty minutes forty seconds east, three thousand three hundred eighty and nine-tenths feet to monument number sixty-two, at corner of the towns of Sandgate and Rupert; thence north one degree forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds east, three thousand nine hundred eighty-six and seven-tenths feet to monument number sixty-three on the south side of the Salem-Rupert road; thence north one degree forty minutes thirty-three seconds east, six hundred forty-one and five-tenths feet to monument number sixty-four, on the south side of right of way of Delaware and Hudson railroad; thence north one degree thirty-eight minutes nine seconds east, three thousand four hundred sixty-four and two-tenths feet to monument number sixty-five, at the top of long open slope on north side of and overlooking the valley at West Rupert; thence north three degrees twenty-three minutes thirty-four seconds east, three thousand six hundred sixty-one and seven-tenths feet to monument number sixty-seven, at a point about midway between two highways and about one and one-third miles north of Delaware and Hudson railroad; thence north three degrees thirty-one minutes fifty-five seconds east, three thousand three hundred twenty-six and two-tenths feet to monument number sixty-nine, on sloping ground between two brooks; thence north one degree twenty-three minutes thirty-one seconds east, twenty thousand four hundred fifty-six and two-tenths feet to monument number seventy-six, at the corner of the counties of Bennington and Rutland; thence north one degree thirty-two minutes three seconds east, fourteen thousand twenty-five and five-tenths feet to monument number eighty, in West Pawlet on north side of highway leading southwest out of said village and about three hundred fifty feet from the Delaware and Hudson railroad crossing in West Pawlet; thence north one degree forty-nine minutes fourteen seconds east, twenty thousand three hundred eighty-one and nine-tenths feet to monument number ninety, at the corner of the towns of Pawlet and Wells; thence north one degree thirty-five minutes twenty-nine seconds east, nineteen thousand three hundred seventy-two and nine-tenths feet to monument number ninety-six, at the corner of the towns of Wells and Poultney; thence north one degree twenty-eight minutes fifty-nine seconds east, nineteen thousand two hundred forty-five and two-tenths feet to monument number one hundred one, on the south bank of Poultney river; thence about fifty-five feet along the previous course continued in the middle of the deepest channel of said river; thence along the middle of the deepest channel of said river to East bay; thence along the middle of the deepest channel of East bay and the waters thereof to where the same communicates with Lake Champlain; thence along the middle of the deepest channel of Lake Champlain to the eastward of the islands called the Four Brothers and westward of the islands called Grand isle and Long isle or the Two Heroes, and to the westward of the Isle La Mott, to the parallel of the forty-fifth degree north latitude, as run by Valentine and Collins, seventeen hundred and seventy-one to seventeen hundred and seventy-four; according to report dated October seventh, seventeen hundred and ninety-one, of commissioners appointed by chapter eighteen of the laws passed at the thirteenth session of the legislature of this state in seventeen hundred and ninety; thereby including within the state of New York, all that portion of the former town of Fair Haven, formerly in the county of Rutland and state of Vermont, lying westerly from the middle of the deepest channel of Poultney river as it now runs, and between the middle of the deepest channel of such river and the west line of the state of Vermont, as established on March nineteen, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine, as the same is described in an act of the legislature of Vermont entitled "An act annexing that portion of the town of Fair Haven, lying west of Poultney river, to the state of New York," and approved by the governor of Vermont, November twenty-seven, eighteen hundred and seventy-six. The acceptance by this state of sovereignty and jurisdiction of such ceded territory which took effect April seventh, eighteen hundred and eighty, the date of the approval of the act of congress consenting to such cession, is continued in force. Nothing in this section contained shall be deemed to affect the determination of the boundary line between the state of New York and the commonwealth of Massachusetts.