senate Bill S123

Provides that the state board of medicine shall promulgate regulations requiring cultural competency courses in all colleges of medicine

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Sponsor

Bill Status


  • Introduced
  • In Committee
  • On Floor Calendar
    • Passed Senate
    • Passed Assembly
  • Delivered to Governor
  • Signed/Vetoed by Governor
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actions

  • 07 / Jan / 2009
    • REFERRED TO HIGHER EDUCATION
  • 06 / Jan / 2010
    • REFERRED TO HIGHER EDUCATION

Summary

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Bill Details

Versions:
S123
Legislative Cycle:
2009-2010
Current Committee:
Senate Higher Education
Law Section:
Education Law

Sponsor Memo

BILL NUMBER: S123

TITLE OF BILL :
An act to amend the education law, in relation to authorizing the
state board for medicine and the commissioner of education to
promulgate rules and regulations for physician training


PURPOSE OR GENERAL IDEA OF BILL :
To authorize the state board for medicine together with the
commissioner of education to promulgate regulations requiring cultural
competency in physician training.

SUMMARY OF SPECIFIC PROVISIONS :
Section 6523 of the education law, as amended by chapter 364 of the
laws of 1991, states that the state board for medicine shall prescribe
the following requirements for physician training, by regulation, in
consultation with the commissioner: (a) The curriculum in each college
of medicine in this state shall include one or more cultural
competency courses which are designed to address the problem of race
and gender-based disparities in medical treatment decisions and are
developed in consultation with the Association of American Medical
College or another nationally recognized organization which reviews
medical school curricula.

JUSTIFICATION :
The history of hospital care and access to health care has usually
mirrored the educational, social and ethical issues confronting
American society at any point in time in our history. Current advances
in medical technology have increased the complexity of care, and
research has shown measurable differences in access to medical
procedures based on race and culture. Thus, African American patients
are far less likely to undergo cardiac catherization, angioplasty and
bypass graft surgery. They also undergo fewer invasive, diagnostic and
therapeutic coronary procedures after myocardial infarction. Similar
differences have been noted in decisions about discretionary surgery,
surgical treatments for breast cancer, and prostate cancer treatment.
Research also shows that African American patients with peripheral
vascular disease are more likely to receive amputations than white
patients, and patients suffering from sickle-cell disease, which
disproportionately affects African Americans, have been misdiagnosed
by health professionals as being drug addicts and denied treatment.
Some of these differences can be attributed to differences in income,
insurance coverage and resistance to treatment. However, even after
discounting these variables, there are disparities that are clearly
rooted in racial and cultural misperceptions and stereotypes. This
legislation seeks to address these issues.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY :
S.7711 of 2008 04/25/08 Referred to Higher Education

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS FOR STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS :
None.

EFFECTIVE DATE :
On the 90th day after it shall have become a law.
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