senate Bill S1440A

2011-2012 Legislative Session

Provides for banning the possession, sale or manufacture of assault weapons, subject to an exception; expands duties of superintendent of state police; repealer

download bill text pdf

Sponsored By

Archive: Last Bill Status -


  • Introduced
  • In Committee
  • On Floor Calendar
    • Passed Senate
    • Passed Assembly
  • Delivered to Governor
  • Signed/Vetoed by Governor

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Actions

view actions (4)
Assembly Actions - Lowercase
Senate Actions - UPPERCASE
Oct 03, 2012 print number 1440a
amend and recommit to codes
Jan 04, 2012 referred to codes
Jan 07, 2011 referred to codes

Co-Sponsors

S1440 - Details

Law Section:
Penal Law
Laws Affected:
Rpld §265.00 sub 22, amd §§265.00 & 265.20, Pen L; amd §396-ff, Gen Bus L
Versions Introduced in 2009-2010 Legislative Session:
S4084

S1440 - Summary

Adds additional weapon models to the definition of an assault weapon and adds related definitions; bans the possession, sale or manufacture of assault weapons, subject to an exception; expands the duties of the superintendent of state police with respect to identifying assault weapons.

S1440 - Sponsor Memo

S1440 - Bill Text download pdf

                    S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
________________________________________________________________________

                                  1440

                       2011-2012 Regular Sessions

                            I N  S E N A T E

                             January 7, 2011
                               ___________

Introduced  by Sen. SQUADRON -- read twice and ordered printed, and when
  printed to be committed to the Committee on Codes

AN ACT to amend the penal law and the general business law, in  relation
  to banning the possession, sale or manufacture of assault weapons; and
  to  repeal  subdivision 22 of section 265.00 of the penal law relating
  thereto

  THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND  ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section  1.  The  New York state legislature finds that semi-automatic
assault weapons are military-style guns  designed  to  allow  rapid  and
accurate spray firing for the quick and efficient killing of humans. The
shooter  can  simply point - as opposed to carefully aim - the weapon to
quickly spray a wide area with a hail of bullets. Gun manufacturers have
for many years made,  marketed  and  sold  to  civilians  semi-automatic
versions of military assault weapons designed with features specifically
intended  to  increase lethality for military applications. As a result,
approximately 2,000,000 assault weapons are currently in circulation  in
the  United  States. These weapons have been the weapon of choice in the
most notorious mass  shootings  of  innocent  civilians  in  the  United
States,  including  the  1999 massacre at Columbine High School (TEC-DC9
assault pistol and Hi-Point Carbine) and the 2002 Washington,  D.C.-area
sniper shootings (Bushmaster XM15 assault rifle). According to FBI data,
between 1998 and 2001, one in five law enforcement officers slain in the
line  of  duty was killed with an assault weapon. In 2003, New York lost
two of its finest when undercover officers in the elite Firearms  Inves-
tigation  Unit  of the NYPD Organized Crime Control Bureau were brutally
murdered while attempting to purchase an  illegal  TEC-9  semi-automatic
assault weapon. The availability of military-style assault weapons poses
a serious threat to the public health and safety. Most citizens, includ-
ing  most  gun owners, believe that assault weapons should not be avail-
able for civilian use.

 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                      [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                           LBD02260-01-1

Co-Sponsors

S1440A (ACTIVE) - Details

Law Section:
Penal Law
Laws Affected:
Rpld §265.00 sub 22, amd §§265.00 & 265.20, Pen L; amd §396-ff, Gen Bus L
Versions Introduced in 2009-2010 Legislative Session:
S4084

S1440A (ACTIVE) - Summary

Adds additional weapon models to the definition of an assault weapon and adds related definitions; bans the possession, sale or manufacture of assault weapons, subject to an exception; expands the duties of the superintendent of state police with respect to identifying assault weapons.

S1440A (ACTIVE) - Sponsor Memo

S1440A (ACTIVE) - Bill Text download pdf

                    S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
________________________________________________________________________

                                 1440--A

                       2011-2012 Regular Sessions

                            I N  S E N A T E

                             January 7, 2011
                               ___________

Introduced  by Sens. SQUADRON, GIANARIS -- read twice and ordered print-
  ed, and when printed to be committed to  the  Committee  on  Codes  --
  recommitted  to  the Committee on Codes in accordance with Senate Rule
  6, sec. 8 -- committee discharged, bill amended, ordered reprinted  as
  amended and recommitted to said committee

AN  ACT to amend the penal law and the general business law, in relation
  to banning the possession, sale or manufacture of assault weapons; and
  to repeal subdivision 22 of section 265.00 of the penal  law  relating
  thereto

  THE  PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section 1. The New York state legislature  finds  that  semi-automatic
assault  weapons  are  military-style  guns  designed to allow rapid and
accurate spray firing for the quick and efficient killing of humans. The
shooter can simply point - as opposed to carefully aim - the  weapon  to
quickly spray a wide area with a hail of bullets. Gun manufacturers have
for  many  years  made,  marketed  and  sold to civilians semi-automatic
versions of military assault weapons designed with features specifically
intended to increase lethality for military applications. As  a  result,
approximately  2,000,000 assault weapons are currently in circulation in
the United States. These weapons have been the weapon of choice  in  the
most  notorious  mass  shootings  of  innocent  civilians  in the United
States, including the 1999 massacre at Columbine  High  School  (TEC-DC9
assault  pistol and Hi-Point Carbine) and the 2002 Washington, D.C.-area
sniper shootings (Bushmaster XM15 assault rifle). According to FBI data,
between 1998 and 2001, one in five law enforcement officers slain in the
line of duty was killed with an assault weapon. In 2003, New  York  lost
two  of its finest when undercover officers in the elite Firearms Inves-
tigation Unit of the NYPD Organized Crime Control Bureau  were  brutally
murdered  while  attempting  to purchase an illegal TEC-9 semi-automatic
assault weapon. The availability of military-style assault weapons poses

 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                      [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                           LBD02260-02-2

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