senate Bill S7277A

Signed By Governor
2011-2012 Legislative Session

Relates to requirements for unit pricing in certain retail stores

download bill text pdf

Sponsored By

Archive: Last Bill Status - Signed by Governor


  • Introduced
  • In Committee
  • On Floor Calendar
    • Passed Senate
    • Passed Assembly
  • Delivered to Governor
  • Signed by Governor

do you support this bill?

Actions

view actions (14)
Assembly Actions - Lowercase
Senate Actions - UPPERCASE
Aug 17, 2012 signed chap.427
Aug 06, 2012 delivered to governor
Jun 06, 2012 returned to senate
passed assembly
ordered to third reading rules cal.59
substituted for a9593a
referred to codes
delivered to assembly
passed senate
May 21, 2012 advanced to third reading
May 16, 2012 2nd report cal.
amended 7277a
May 15, 2012 1st report cal.753
May 02, 2012 referred to agriculture

Votes

view votes

Bill Amendments

Original
A (Active)
Original
A (Active)

S7277 - Bill Details

See Assembly Version of this Bill:
A9593A
Law Section:
Agriculture and Markets Law
Laws Affected:
Amd §214-h, Ag & Mkts L

S7277 - Bill Texts

view summary

Relates to requirements for unit pricing in certain non-chain convenience stores.

view sponsor memo
BILL NUMBER:S7277

TITLE OF BILL:
An act
to amend the agriculture and markets law, in relation to unit pricing

PURPOSE:
To amend the unit pricing law to include chain stores with
annual sales of consumer commodities in excess of $2.5 million.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:
This bill would amend the exemption provisions
contained within the unit pricing law to require unit pricing
disclosure in chain stores selling more than 82.5 million of consumer
commodities per year.

JUSTIFICATION:
The unit pricing law requires stores selling over $2.5
million per location per year of consumer commodities to disclose the
price per measure as well as the retail selling price. This allows
customers to comparison shop so as to find the best value.

Unit pricing is particularly important today because manufacturers of
grocery items no longer sell products in standard sizes. Consumers
are faced with a confusing array of packages for all kinds of
products including coffee, ice cream, tuna fish, cosmetics, soaps and
detergents and paper products. The unit pricing law provides the only
real means a customer has to find the best value between brands and
container sizes.

Consumer commodities covered under the pricing law include both human
and pet food, paper products and food wrappings, soaps, detergents
and other cleaning products, as well as non-prescription drugs and
toiletries,

The Department of Agriculture and Markets reports receiving a number
of consumer complaints regarding discount stores who sell significant
amounts of consumer commodities, but claim to be exempt from the unit
pricing requirements.

This bill would allow the Department to better enforce the law and
respond more quickly to consumer complaints without having to conduct
a financial audit of chain stores on a per location basis.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:
New Bill.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS:
None.

EFFECTIVE DATE:
This bill shall take effect on the 180th day after becoming a law.

view full text
download pdf
                    S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
________________________________________________________________________

                                  7277

                            I N  S E N A T E

                               May 2, 2012
                               ___________

Introduced  by Sen. GRISANTI -- read twice and ordered printed, and when
  printed to be committed to the Committee on Agriculture

AN ACT to amend the agriculture and markets law,  in  relation  to  unit
  pricing

  THE  PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section 1. Paragraph b of subdivision 3 of section 214-h of the  agri-
culture  and markets law, as amended by chapter 323 of the laws of 1993,
is amended to read as follows:
  b. The provisions of this  section  shall  not  apply  TO  CONVENIENCE
STORES  WHICH  INCLUDE  SMALL  STORES  WHICH  TYPICALLY SELL MOTOR FUEL,
TOBACCO PRODUCTS, FAST FOOD AND BEVERAGES AND DO  NOT  OFFER  SUFFICIENT
QUANTITY  OF CONSUMER COMMODITIES TO MAKE UNIT PRICING USEFUL TO CONSUM-
ERS OR to any retail store having had annual  gross  sales  of  consumer
commodities  in the previous calendar year of less than two and one-half
million dollars, UNLESS THE STORE IS A PART  OF  A  NETWORK  OF  SUBSID-
IARIES,  AFFILIATES  OR  OTHER  MEMBER  STORES, UNDER DIRECT OR INDIRECT
COMMON CONTROL, WHICH, AS A GROUP, HAD ANNUAL GROSS SALES  THE  PREVIOUS
CALENDAR  YEAR  OF  TWO AND ONE-HALF MILLION DOLLARS OR MORE OF CONSUMER
COMMODITIES.
  S 2.  This act shall take   effect on the one  hundred  eightieth  day
after it shall have become a law.





 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                      [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                           LBD14958-01-2

S7277A (ACTIVE) - Bill Details

See Assembly Version of this Bill:
A9593A
Law Section:
Agriculture and Markets Law
Laws Affected:
Amd §214-h, Ag & Mkts L

S7277A (ACTIVE) - Bill Texts

view summary

Relates to requirements for unit pricing in certain non-chain convenience stores.

view sponsor memo
BILL NUMBER:S7277A

TITLE OF BILL:
An act
to amend the agriculture and markets law, in relation to unit pricing

PURPOSE:
To amend the unit pricing law to include chain stores with
annual sales of consumer commodities in excess of $2.5 million.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:
This bill would amend the exemption provisions
contained within the unit pricing law to require unit pricing
disclosure in chain stores selling more than $2.5 million of consumer
commodities per year.

JUSTIFICATION:
The unit pricing law requires stores selling over $2.5
million per location per year of consumer commodities to disclose
the price per measure as well as the retail selling price. This
allows customers to comparison shop so as to find the best value.

Unit pricing is particularly important today because manufacturers of
grocery items no longer sell products in standard sizes. Consumers
are faced with a confusing array of packages for all kinds of
products including coffee, ice cream, tuna fish, cosmetics, soaps and
detergents and paper products. The unit pricing law provides the only
real means a customer has to find the best value between brands and
container sizes.

Consumer commodities covered under the pricing law include both human
and pet food, paper products and food wrappings, soaps, detergents
and other cleaning products, as well as non-prescription drugs and
toiletries.

The Department of Agriculture and Markets reports receiving a number
of consumer complaints regarding discount stores who sell significant
amounts of consumer commodities, but claim to be exempt from the unit
pricing requirements.

This bill would allow the Department to better enforce the law and
respond more quickly to consumer complaints without having to conduct
a financial audit of chain stores on a per location basis.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:
New Bill.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS:
None.

EFFECTIVE DATE:

This bill shall take effect on the 180th day after becoming a law.

view full text
download pdf
                    S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
________________________________________________________________________

                                 7277--A
    Cal. No. 753

                            I N  S E N A T E

                               May 2, 2012
                               ___________

Introduced  by Sen. GRISANTI -- read twice and ordered printed, and when
  printed to be committed to the Committee on  Agriculture  --  reported
  favorably  from  said  committee,  ordered to first report, amended on
  first report, ordered to a second  report,  and  to  be  reprinted  as
  amended, retaining its place in the order of second report

AN  ACT  to  amend  the agriculture and markets law, in relation to unit
  pricing

  THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND  ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section  1. Paragraph b of subdivision 3 of section 214-h of the agri-
culture and markets law, as amended by chapter 323 of the laws of  1993,
is amended to read as follows:
  b.  The  provisions  of  this  section  shall not apply TO CONVENIENCE
STORES WHICH INCLUDE SMALL  STORES  WHICH  TYPICALLY  SELL  MOTOR  FUEL,
TOBACCO  PRODUCTS,  FAST  FOOD AND BEVERAGES AND DO NOT OFFER SUFFICIENT
QUANTITY OF CONSUMER COMMODITIES TO MAKE UNIT PRICING USEFUL TO  CONSUM-
ERS  OR  to  any  retail store having had annual gross sales of consumer
commodities in the previous calendar year of less than two and  one-half
million  dollars,  UNLESS  THE  STORE  IS A PART OF A NETWORK OF SUBSID-
IARIES, AFFILIATES OR OTHER MEMBER  STORES,  UNDER  DIRECT  OR  INDIRECT
COMMON  CONTROL, WITH FIVE OR MORE STORES LOCATED IN NEW YORK, WHICH, AS
A GROUP, HAD ANNUAL GROSS SALES THE PREVIOUS CALENDAR YEAR  OF  TWO  AND
ONE-HALF MILLION DOLLARS OR MORE OF CONSUMER COMMODITIES.
  S  2.    This act shall take   effect on the one hundred eightieth day
after it shall have become a law.




 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                      [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                           LBD14958-03-2

Comments

Open Legislation comments facilitate discussion of New York State legislation. All comments are subject to moderation. Comments deemed off-topic, commercial, campaign-related, self-promotional; or that contain profanity or hate speech; or that link to sites outside of the nysenate.gov domain are not permitted, and will not be published. Comment moderation is generally performed Monday through Friday.

By contributing or voting you agree to the Terms of Participation and verify you are over 13.