Assembly Bill A4093

2023-2024 Legislative Session

Establishes the "winter moratorium on evictions act of 2023"

download bill text pdf

Sponsored By

Current Bill Status - In Assembly Committee


  • Introduced
    • In Committee Assembly
    • In Committee Senate
    • On Floor Calendar Assembly
    • On Floor Calendar Senate
    • Passed Assembly
    • Passed Senate
  • Delivered to Governor
  • Signed By Governor

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2023-A4093 (ACTIVE) - Details

Current Committee:
Assembly Housing
Law Section:
Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law
Laws Affected:
Amd §§711, 741, 747, 749 & 768, add §753-a, RPAP L; add §235-j, RP L

2023-A4093 (ACTIVE) - Summary

Establishes the "winter moratorium on evictions act of 2023" to prohibit eviction of tenants from residential properties during the winter months.

2023-A4093 (ACTIVE) - Bill Text download pdf

                             
                     S T A T E   O F   N E W   Y O R K
 ________________________________________________________________________
 
                                   4093
 
                        2023-2024 Regular Sessions
 
                           I N  A S S E M B L Y
 
                             February 9, 2023
                                ___________
 
 Introduced  by  M.  of  A.  KELLES,  CUNNINGHAM,  RAGA  -- read once and
   referred to the Committee on Housing
 
 AN ACT to amend the real property actions and proceedings  law  and  the
   real  property  law,  in relation to prohibiting residential evictions
   during the winter months

   THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND  ASSEM-
 BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:
 
   Section  1.  Short  Title. This act shall be known and may be cited as
 the "winter moratorium on evictions act of 2023".
   § 2. Legislative findings and declaration of emergency.  The  legisla-
 ture hereby finds and declares all of the following:
   The  serious  public  emergency  regarding  the scarcity of affordable
 housing across New York State continues to  exist,  and  such  emergency
 puts  families  and  individuals  at  a  heightened  risk  of  eviction,
 displacement, and homelessness.
   The legislature recognizes that  evictions  trigger  long-lasting  and
 irreparable  harm  to  public health and safety. Evictions are linked to
 all-cause mortality and lead to an array of negative mental and physical
 health outcomes including higher rates of  emergency  room  utilization,
 mental health hospitalizations, suicide, children's hospitalization, and
 depression.  Evictions  directly  result in job loss and disruption to a
 child's education. Those who have experienced an eviction are more like-
 ly to live in substandard housing and have greater residential precarity
 and are less likely to secure safe and affordable housing  in  the  long
 term. These consequences are disproportionately felt by Black and Latinx
 households, who face the highest rates of eviction.
   Evictions  are  a significant cause of homelessness, both directly and
 indirectly. In New York City, 25 percent of  shelter  residents  and  12
 percent  of unsheltered individuals are homeless due to an eviction. The
 Department of Housing and Urban Development identified at  least  91,271
 homeless  individuals  throughout  New  York  State  as of January 2020,
 
  EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                       [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                            LBD02244-01-3
              

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amberlady62
3 months ago

My concern for landlords in the State of New York is that at some point they are going to get weary of all the restrictions placed on them. No one will want to be a landlord in the State of New York. What we will be left with is public housing, student housing and home owners. New Ork State continues to create laws that are prohibitive to running a business here. Do tenants need to be protected, sure. But instead of constantly bailing them out why don't we teach them to be self reliant?

Anonymous
2 months ago

I have been ill for the last year and a half, my 4 kids and I are being evicted on December 20th because I refused to fix anymore of the landlords house. I get retaliated against and evicted for Christmas but the landlords have it tough? I put over 30 grand of my own money on top of the rent into where we lived and a justice decided the judgment before I ever walked into the court room. Whether it was improper service, retaliatory behavior, not filling out paperwork for ERAP to get his money, entering apartment without permission and taking pictures, putting utilities in my name without my consent that is the type of person who gets backed in courts. Not the person who's trying to raise his kids and do the next right thing, the nice guy is only good until he won't or can't do whatever the people want.

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