SENATOR SERRANO'S ASTHMA STUDY LEGISLATION PASSES NEW YORK STATE SENATE

(Albany, NY) - On Tuesday, June 17th, the New York State Senate passed Senator José M.

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SEN. FARLEY REPORTS SENATE PASSES CPR IN SCHOOLS BILL

State Senator Hugh T. Farley (R, C, I – Schenectady) reports that he and his colleagues in the New York State Senate passed legislation recently that would enable high school students to be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of automated defibrillators (AEDs).

According to the American Heart Association, about 400,000 people have sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital every year, and only about 10 percent of them survive, most likely because they don’t receive timely CPR. Given right away, CPR doubles or triples survival rates.

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SEN. FARLEY REPORTS SENATE PASSES BILLS TO MAKE COLLEGE MORE AFFORDABLE

State Senator Hugh T. Farley (R, C, I – Schenectady) reports that he and his colleagues in the New York State Senate recently passed five bills to make college more affordable for students and their families, while setting students up for success. These bills provide opportunities to help New York students thrive by increasing awards in the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) to equal the cost per semester of SUNY and CUNY tuition, alleviating student loan debt, giving access to free community college to eligible students, and providing targeted work-training programs.

The college affordability bills approved by the Senate today include the following legislation:

Increasing TAP Awards

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SEN. FARLEY REPORTS SENATE PASSES PACKAGE OF BILLS TO FIGHT THE FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION OF SENIOR CITIZENS

State Senator Hugh T. Farley (R, C, I – Schenectady) reports that he and his colleagues in the New York State Senate recently passed a package of eight bills to prevent criminals from using financial schemes to prey upon senior citizens. The measures were recommended in a report released by the Senate Majority Coalition in May that examined this growing issue that affects thousands of senior New Yorkers each year.

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Senator Farley Salutes Flag Day

Saturday, June 14th, is Flag Day. This day is meant to reflect on the true meaning and history of the American flag. Our forefathers stood up for freedom and liberty, creating the United States of America. The flag represents this struggle for independence. Our American flag has long exemplified the spirit of those who lost their lives in battle, as well as those who fought valiantly and survived. As a former teacher and a history enthusiast, Senator Farley would like to share a few Flag Day and flag facts.

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SEN. FARLEY REPORTS SENATE PASSES BILL TO MAKE RESIDENTIAL YOUTH FACILITIES SAFER

State Senator Hugh T. Farley (R, C, I – Schenectady) reports that he and his colleagues in the New York State Senate recently passed a measure to protect the staff and youth in group homes and other youth residential facilities. “Renee’s Law” (S2625B) increases the criminal history and other information available to those involved in residential placements for violent youth offenders so that a thorough evaluation of the youth's rehabilitation and the risk they pose to the community can be performed.

The measure was named for Renee Greco, a 24-year-old youth care worker who was killed at a group home for troubled youths in Lockport, Niagara County

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SEN. FARLEY REPORTS SENATE GIVES FINAL PASSAGE TO “VINCE’S LAW”

State Senator Hugh T. Farley (R, C, I – Schenectady) reported that he and his colleagues in the New York State Senate recently gave final legislative passage to “Vince’s Law,” a bill that would significantly toughen criminal penalties to get persistent drunk drivers off the road.

Bill S7108 would extend the period of time in which multiple Driving While Intoxicated convictions can occur in order to be considered a felony. Under the bill, an individual convicted of three or more DWIs within 15 preceding years would be charged with a Class D felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.

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